Brigadoon Is Back– VCFA Writing for Children & Young Adults Winter Residency

LATE BREAKING NEWS!

YOU REALLY CAN “BE” AT THE RESIDENCY via LIVESTREAM!

CLICK HERE TO WATCH LIVE

ON MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 16 AT 10 A. M. Kekla Magoon and Cynthia Leitich Smith will discuss Kekla’s book X: A Novel.  Written for young adult readers, the book follows the formative years of Malcolm X, one of the most influential African American figures of the 20th Century. Kekla co-wrote the book with Ilyasah Shabazz, Malcom X’s daughter. Released in 2015, the book won the 2016 Coretta Scott King Honor Book Award and the 2016 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work for Youth/Teens, among other honors.

It’s that time of year. Eager authors flock to the Burlington airport, then share cabs and shuttles on to Vermont College of Fine Arts’ Montpelier campus.

Brigadoon is reborn. The children’s writers are back!

This year’s winter residency runs from January 11 through 20.

We’ll welcome visiting faculty member Martha Brockenbrough.

Martha is the award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction for young readers and adults. Her novel The Game of Love and Death(Scholastic) was a finalist for the Kirkus Prize and a winner of the Pacific Northwest Bookseller Association and Washington State Book awards, as well as a YALSA Top 100 Readers Choice Award. Best- or scariest- of all Martha is a grammar guru and the founder of National Grammar Day.

We also welcome A. S. King and Uma Krishnaswami back to active faculty status! HIP HIP HOORAY! And congratulations in advance to their lucky new advisees.

Every winter residency features a visiting Author/Illustrator and a Writer-In-Residence. This year’s guests are stellar.

Don Tate has illustrated or authored numerous books for children.He is the illustrator of the critically acclaimed Hope’s Gift (Putnam Juvenile); Duke Ellington’s Nutcracker Suite (Charlesbridge); She Loved Baseball(HarperCollins); and Ron’s Big Mission (Penguin), among others. Don is the author of the award-winning It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw (Lee & Low Books). His other titles include The Cart That Carried Martin (Charlesbridge, 2013, Illustrator) and Slave Poet(Peachtree, 2015, Author/lllustrator). Don’s illustrations also appear regularly in newspapers, magazines, and on products for children such as wallpaper, textiles, calendars, apparel, and paper products.

Kathy Erskine is the author of five children’s novels including National Book Award winner Mockingbird, Jane Addams Peace Award honor book Seeing Red, and most recently, The Badger Knight, a Junior Library Guild Selection. Mama Africa, her first picture book, a biography of South African singer and activist Miriam Makeba, will be published in fall 2017. Also coming next fall is a middle-grade novel, The Incredibile Magic of Being, about a boy with anxiety who believes in the power of the universe to save us.

Erskine draws on her life stories and world events in her writing and is currently working on several more novels and picture books.

Of course the schedule is packed with workshops, meetings, orientations and readings. But what about the lectures? The winter residency will feature some great ones! Look out for these superb faculty lectures:

SCIENCE, MAGIC, AND NEOTENY by Will Alexander, FISH TALKS WATER by Tom Birdseye, LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND RESPONSIBILITY by Martha Brockenbrough, ON THE ORIGINS OF THE PTERODACTYL by Alan Cumyn, GOING DEEP: AN HOUR OF PRACTICE AND DISCUSSION by A.M. Jenkins, FEMINISM IN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE by Amy King, FINDING THAT ZING: LIFTING OUR CREATIVE EFFORTS OUT OF THE ORDINARY by Jane Kurtz, THE NEW SINCERITY by Martine Leavitt, I SEE THE MOON AND THE MOON SEES ME: THE NATURAL WORLD AS THE ULTIMATE UNIVERSAL by Liz Garton Scanlon, A CONVERSATION WITH KEKLA MAGOON ABOUT X: A NOVEL by Cynthia Leitich Smith and Kekla Magoon, PLAYING WITH AMBIGUITY: OFFERING OPEN INTERPRETATIONS AND OPEN ENDS by Nova Ren Suma, A SECOND IS A HICCUP by Linda Urban

AND THESE JAW DROPPING STUDENT LECTURES:

GETTING UNSTUCK: HOW TO WRITE WITH ABANDON by Kate Angelella, MAKE THE READER YOUR ACCOMPLICE by Jennifer Cameron Bailey, NOT JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM! CREATIVE APPROACHES TO PICTURE BOOK BIOGRAPHIES by Donna J. Bowman Bratton, CRAFTING CONNECTIONS: THE BENEFITS OF LITERARY TECHNIQUES IN NONFICTION PICTURE BOOKS by Beth Brody, STRONG IN THE BROKEN PLACES: CRAFTING SATISFYING HEALING JOURNEYS by Rachel Coleman, THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT: SUBVERSIVE ENDINGS IN PICTURE BOOKS by Kristy Everington, LARP: LIVING, ACTUAL, REAL PEOPLE WRITING TOOLS I’VE LEARNED AS A LIVE-ACTION ROLE PLAYER by Julia Heller, THE CURSE OF GROWING UP IN FICTION. PERIOD. by Yamile Méndez, WHY SHOULD READERS CARE? HOW TO RAISE STAKES AND BUILD TENSION IN YOUR NOVEL by Laura Melchor, USING HUMOR TO ENGAGE YOUR READER EFFECTIVELY AND EMOTIONALLY by Colin Murcray,  WAR. WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR? ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING: WAR AS SETTING, MOTIVATION AND CHARACTER by Anita Pazner, WRITERS AS PUPPETEERS: CRAFTING CHARACTER AND STORY THROUGH THE PRINCIPLES OF PERFORMANCE by Janine Pibal, BUILDING AND SUSTAINING AN ARTISTIC LIFE by Denise Santomauro, THE MAKINGS OF A MONSTER: CRAFTING THE HUMAN MONSTER IN YOUNG ADULT ZOMBIE NOVELS by Schuyler Elizabeth Sorensen, ANIMAL-HUMAN CONNECTION by Suma Subramaniam, NOT BY BREAD ALONE, BUT NOT WITHOUT IT EITHER: TAPPING INTO THE EMOTIONAL POWER OF FOOD IN OUR WRITING by Eric Taylor, WORLD-BUILDING ISN’T ROCKET SCIENCE:TECHNIQUES FOR MAKING THE UNFAMILIAR ACCESSIBLE TO YOUNG READERS by Diane E. Telgen, A CONVERSATION WITH LOUISA MAY ALCOTT by Tina Vivian, BATHROOM BREAKS & POTTY STOPS: USING RESTROOMS AS SECRET SPACES IN MIDDLE GRADE AND YOUNG ADULT FICTION by Jennifer Whistle

!!!!!!!!!!!

I can’t wait to listen to them all!

Everyone who knows and loves VCFA gets a bit wistful when a new residency rolls around.  We hate missing out. But if you’ve graduated don’t despair. Lectures will be available for streaming soon and Zu Vincent (who’s back at the residency again, with her inspiring writing-based yoga sessions) will be here in the Tollbooth on January 29 making recommendations for DON’T MISS LECTURES.

Until then join us virtually at the VCFA commons. Don’t know how to log on there? Contact us here at the Tollbooth at ThroughTheTollbooth@yahoo.com and we’ll guide you through the process.

(gorgeous campus photo of VCFA in the Snow by Ingrid Sundberg)

As always there are several Tollboothers embedded at the residency ready to fill you in on all the comings and goings fit to print and share. What do you want to know? What do you wish you could hear more about? Let us know and we’ll bridge the gap from where ever you are all the way back to Brigadoon.

Doesn’t it feel almost as if you never left?

~ Tami Lewis Brown~

Message to the Void: You Don’t Own Me

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We are lonesome animals. We spend all our live trying to be less lonesome. And one of our ancient methods is to tell a story, begging the listener to say, and to feel, “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.” John Steinbeck

I wrote my first novel in a small room next to the kitchen during teacher vacations. I sat alone, day after day, week after week. Though I had written a couple of short stories and many poems before, I had never written a novel.

I had never been alone with myself that much.

I grew up with four siblings. My childhood friends had large families. As a teacher, I spent my days with thirty or more young people, and as many staff members.

Novel writing means sitting in a void of silence and solitude. It is painful. For me it can feel nonhuman. Making up pretend people who do pretend things seems, at times, beside the point. Why not be with living people who do real things?

Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god. –Aristotle

But still, the need to write tugs.

At first I found all sorts of reasons not to sit in that small room alone. The dog needed to go out. I should call my mother. The bills, the dishes, the laundry were unfinished. Voices called me, helped me make excuses, helped pull me away from the hardest thing about writing: The struggle of isolation.

I forced myself, my eye on the prize of getting a novel written. Gradually I got attached to my characters, and interested in my story for its own sake. By some miracle, I finished the book. It was in no way polished, but when I finished the draft a few people read it. I revised it and sent it to an agent or two but it eventually took up a space on my shelf, gathering dust.

The second book was about the same. I wrote while wrestling with solitude. When the draft was done, I think three people read it, including me.

The third book was a NaNoWriMo novel that I drafted in a month. No one, thankfully, ever read that book, or most of the subsequent revisions.

I submitted revised opening of the third book with my application to Vermont College of Fine Arts Masters in Writing for Children and Young Adults program.

Attending VCFA was like waking up to find myself in an enormous, multi-generational family the likes of which I’d never seen.

I met people. Writerly people. Fun, kind, interesting, brilliant, stimulating people. Suddenly, I was part of a far-reaching human collective that didn’t go away, even when I was alone.

Now when I wrote at home, I no longer felt like I was in a little room, writing into a grey fog. I had an advisor expecting my work. I had to submit to the critique group. Fellow students shared work with me. At each residency, I made new friends who loved writing for children.

Facebook widened my circle of writer buddies: I had friends to cheer for and who cheered me on. Attending conferences and retreats added more folks to my network that includes writers and readers from around the world. I joined a regular critique group.

Most of my friends are writers, teachers, artists or a combination of these.

Most of my friends care about my success, as I care about theirs.

My daily news is filled with new books, author visits and possibilities for writers. It’s also got reality checks, like how many zillion times you need to send work out before it gets bought. Or sad news of publishers leaving, or fine editors and agents quitting, or books going out of print.

Every single day I learn something new from a friend that I didn’t have when I began my first book alone so many years ago.

I still struggle with the poverty of solitude. I avoid my writing. I act like an orphan, alone and afraid. But I am not.

As I stare at my screen or my journal, loneliness does not take me over.

In this very bleak time in American history, when the void flicks an evil finger at me, I can say resolutely: You do not own me. I have my people. And they have me.

We are here holding our places in the creative world.

This saves me every moment of every day.

Linden McNeilly

 

Lessons From a High School Reunion I Didn’t Attend

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My 40th high school reunion took place this week about 400 miles away. I didn’t attend. So I had a virtual reunion the following day: at home, in my sweats, looking at Facebook photos of people I haven’t seen for years. I recognized many of the women and almost none of the men, who seemed to have sent their middle aged fathers in their places.

I was deeply affected by a collection of photo booth pictures in which alums posed with spouses or besties from high school. I scrolled through the friends arm in arm and wondered aloud, “Were they actually best friends in high school? I don’t remember them even hanging out together.”

The more I scrolled, the more disoriented I felt. Then I got on the phone with my high school best friend, who had gone to the event, and she identified some of the unknowns and we chatted about who was there and who hung out together. She clued me in to some of the long term friendships I had missed, which was most of them.

I started obsessing about those friendships that had escaped my notice. Then I wondered why I couldn’t stop thinking about them. I blamed my own myopic nature for missing the connections around me as I grew up. I felt dull and unaware. I wondered if I still was.

What does this have to do with writing? you ask.

A lot.
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Relationships are everything in storytelling. I’ve been putting a lot of effort into establishing relationships in my main character’s family, his classmates and the people in his small village. But I haven’t thought much about the relationships in the background: how his brothers felt about each other, or how they feel about the kids down the road. Or whether or not my character’s mother has a friend in the village. I’ve kept my spotlight shined only on my main character and thus others stay in the dark, waiting only to come on stage when they are needed.

But now I can imagine a richer world. My character’s brothers could be competing over the affections of the same girl. His mother might feel alienated and lonely in the village, with no one to trade with or gossip with. His father could have a temper that the nearest neighbor witnesses, but keeps secret. His teacher may love the candle maker.

The best books have a thick web of connections, not all of which are directly related to the main character. Each new possibility offers new small plot contributions, denser air around the central story.

What are the unseen connections in your novel? How could you rethink the background relationships in your story? Perhaps what you haven’t paid attention to matters more than you think.