Want to Finish Your Book? Focus on Fascination.

Friends, I am in the process of trying to finish my second book, and let me tell you, it is a difficult task. When I first began my book, I loved it. Words flew from my fingertips. My characters were quirky, weird, and felt just so juicy. I could hardly wait to sit at my computer and write because I was completely immersed in the world I had created. The story held me by my tippy toes and I couldn’t wait to find out what happened next.

In my case, this fascination lasted about 80 pages, before I started to get overwhelmed with the mechanics of writing—were the characters well rounded? Where was the story arc? What were the internal and external conflicts? Was I telling too much? Not enough? Was the problem compelling? Were the characters annoying? Did this book even matter? At the end of the day, ugh! Writing is hard.

That’s when I stumbled across a podcast on The Unmistakable Creative. The guest was Sally Hogshead, a creative author, speaker and marketing expert. (Go check it out, yo.) She talks about the concept of fascination. Fascination is different than interest or just paying attention. Fascination is when you are at your creative best—or for lack of better words—when you are in a pure creative flow. You are in the zone, completely absorbed, and focused on whatever it is that you’re trying to do.

Neuroscientists say when the brain is in a state of fascination, it has the same brain pattern as being in love. This makes complete sense. I have been fascinated, or in love with, people, books, ideas, paintings, cookies, places, music, TV shows and friends. You all know that feeling. It is bliss. Whatever you are fascinated by, is completely engaging and intriguing.

That’s why a brand new idea is wonderful. We are essentially in love with our creation—it’s original, fresh, and intriguing. We can’t stop thinking about it. By the way, if you are a fascinated person, you communicate better, connect better, and love the world better. All cylinders firing—you are your best self. It’s like that movie with Bradley Cooper, LIMITLESS, where he takes the pill that makes him his best self by 1000%. (Man, I really wish there was a pill like that. Come on, Bradley, help a girl out.)

The attention span of the average human being is 9 seconds. And with instant everything, available 24 hours a day, it is getting harder and harder to stay fascinated. Want to hear something fascinating? Only 7% of workers think their bosses are fascinating. We are all walking around, bored out of our minds. There is also a direct correlation between income and fascination of work (not necessarily your job, but whatever you spend most of your time doing.) The more fascinated you are, the higher your income (according to studies), which makes sense. If you’re fascinated by your life/work, the easier it is to make a living.

That’s great, you say. But what if I’m just bored with my project? What if I’m stuck in the middle and can’t find my way out?

Here’s how you can return fascination to your creative writing project:

1. Muscle Memory: Muscles remember stuff, and so does your brain. For example, maybe you’re an excellent athlete. My husband is a great surfer. I hoped that he could teach me to surf so we could surf together. But here’s the thing, he paddles through the waves like butter. He can expertly eye the perfect wave, with just enough shape and force, to get him on his feet, within 0.7 seconds. He rides his surfboard like it’s attached to his body. He hardly has to think about it because he’s done it so many times. When I surf, its laborious. I have to think about every move I make and then my body doesn’t obey, because I haven’t practiced.

The same is true with writing. If you only write sporadically—let’s say every few days or every few weeks—it takes your mind so much longer to get back into the groove of writing. Writing requires muscle memory. People who spend 2-4 hours each day on a consistent project or endeavor are much more successful, than those who don’t.

2. Writing Rituals: Even with muscle memory practice, writing can still feel like dragging your fingernails across a chalk board. Writing rituals can help you harness the original fascination you had at the beginning of your project. Only you know what motivates you to finish your creative project, but many writers have specific rituals they follow to get them in the zone before they write. I listen to the same play list when I write. I also listen to a favorite book on audible, or a favorite inspiring podcast before I write.

Some people read poetry, some writers hand-write a page from an author they admire, before they begin to write their own project. Other authors go on a walk, run a mile, do the dishes, drink a specific cup of tea, or talk to a creative mentor. Whatever it is that inspires you to sit down and get to work, figure it out, and do that. Sometimes before writing, I tell myself that I only have to write 100 words. More often than not, it only takes me 100 clunky words to get in flow of my project.

3. Mechanics: When I become frustrated with a project, I know I need to change my perspective. It could be tweaks with my characters, plot, or tension, but when I’m bored, I know I need to change my view. Deconstruct what it was that drew you to your creative piece. That may mean further research—a field trip, a new hobby to understand a character better, or an interview with an expert.

Are your characters stagnating? Peel back each person piece by piece. What makes them fascinating? Are they their truest self, without a facade? Is your language helping your piece or is it filled with clunky phrases, words or cliches?  If the mechanics of your writing are on point, it can help improve it’s fascination level.

By tapping into what inspired your art, you and your writing will be more successful. Fascination is what inspired you to write in the first place, right?  So let’s finish that book!

I hope these suggestions help. Happy writing!

xo,
Jen

www.jewhitebooks.com